Gourmet Goodies for Fido

For all you dog lovers out there, we have some interesting shops on our new “Cape Cod and Islands Marketplace” (http://www.capecodrestaurants.com/info/cape-cod-marketplace.php).  With the holidays approaching, wouldn’t Fido love some Gourmet Cookies – maybe a lobster cookie or even a shark cookie?  Or how about a Mermaid leash?  If you want to make the treats yourself, here’s a recipe for “Turkey Day Treats” from “The Ultimate Dog Treat Cookbook” by Liz Palika.

                                                      Turkey Day Treats
2 cups diced sweet potato, cooked until very tender
1 1/4 cups whole wheat flour
1 cup warm water
2 large eggs
1  2.5-ounce jar turkey baby food

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Mix together all the ingredients (mixture will be sticky).  Drop by rounded teaspoons onto a greased cookie sheet.  Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until golden brown.  Let cool thoroughly and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.
Makes 40-50 teaspoon -size treats.

Fish Tacos

                                                                  Fish Tacos

A recipe for Fish Tacos from Chef/Owner Kim Premny of the Beacon Room in Orleans.

Serves 2 – 3

Ingredients

1 1/2 lbs. Haddock or Cod (any white flaky fish)
6 Flour tortillas
2 cups Shredded iceberg lettuce
1 cup cooked jasmine rice
1/2 cup Salsa (we make ours but you can buy what you like)
1 cup Black Bean Salad (again store bought will work)
1 Ripe Avocado
1 cup Sriracha creme fraiche (see recipe below)
1 cup of cooking oil

Sriracha creme fraiche:
1 cup of sour cream
1 Tbl fresh lemon juice
3/4 Tbl Cajun seasoning
1 Tbl Sriracha hot sauce
Dash of salt
Blend ingredients in food processor or mix well by hand.

Directions

In deep pan bring cooking oil to a temperature of 350 degrees.  Place lightly floured fish in 4 oz pieces into oil.  Cook approx 3 to 4 min. on each side (you may also bake fish in 450 degree oven for 15 min. instead).  Pull fish from pan and let rest on paper towels.

Place 6 flour tortillas out (you may grill these if you like), layer each with shredded lettuce, salsa, black bean salad, warmed jasmine rice.  Then place your six pieces of fish on top.  Top each with a slice of avocado and plenty of Sriracha creme fraiche.

Bon Appetit!!!

http://www.capecodrestaurants.com/dining-guide/all/11_beacon_room/

 

The Kasbah Chronicles September 2014 / Kitty Morse

                                                                               MUSINGS

I am sending this newsletter in the middle of a heat wave. I will be making this drink as soon as I send this off! I have sent this out before but it bears repeating. Drink up! And use orange blossom water

                                      Moroccan Watermelon and Strawberry Drink

Serves 1

1 cup watermelon cubes
3 sliced strawberries
1/4 cup water
1 teaspoon lemon juice
Sugar to taste
A sprinkle of orange blossom water
Ice cubes
Mint leaf for garnish

Place watermelon, berries, water, lemon juice, and sugar in a blender and liquefy. Strain through a medium mesh sieve, pressing the pulp with the back of a large spoon to extract all the juice.     Transfer to a tall glass and add a sprinkling of orange blossom water. Add ice cubes. Garnish with a mint leaf.

Note: Orange blossom water is available in Middle Eastern markets, and sometimes, liquor stores.

Adapted from Cooking at the Kasbah: Recipes from my Moroccan Kitchen by Kitty Morse (Chronicle Books 1999).

REVIEW MY BOOKS:

Thank you so much to those who have already done so. If you are so inspired, you can write up a review for one of my books on Amazon.com. They are anonymous, and VERY  SHORT. A line or two are enough!

The latest farm-to-fork craze calls for a new look at The California Farm Cookbook (Pelican Publishing 1999.) I interviewed over 250 California farmers and obtained THEIR recipe for THEIR product from the ocean, family farms, ranches, desert oases and northern Baja California. I cook from that book regularly, inspired by a treasure trove of authentic farm recipes.

http://www.amazon.com/California-Farm-Cookbook-Kitty-Morse

Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories:

http://www.amazon.com/Mint-Tea-Minarets-Moroccan-Memories/

A Biblical Feast

http://www.amazon.com/Biblical-Feast-Ancient-Mediterranean-Flavors

Just because: FUN! and WILD!!!

A new wave of Moroccan artists:

These Portraits Of Moroccan Hipsters Are More Nuanced Than They Look

http://huff.to/1D1P6gP

A bientôt!

Kitty

The Incredible Cape Cod Oyster

Each year the Long Pasture Wildlife Sanctuary in Cummaquid on Cape Cod,    http://www.massaudubon.org/get-outdoors/wildlife-sanctuaries/long-pasture, under Sanctuary Director Ian Ives, hosts walking tours of a Barnstable Oyster Farm along with an oyster tasting.  The current tours are all filled but watch our Events feature on the Capecodrestaurants.com website for future tours.  Meanwhile, enjoy a little oyster trivia and a fabulous recipe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that the cultivation of oysters began more than 2,000 years ago in Rome?    Oysters were a staple food for Native Americans.  100 years ago, oyster harvests exceeded 10 million bushels a year.  These days they are not as plentiful – why?  mostly because we ate them.  Today, farming oysters is a big business.  It’s a business that’s great for the environment – oysters feed on algae and filter the water.  Long term, oysters    have the potential to dramatically improve water quality.  Plus they are sooo good!              

And, in case you didn’t know, oysters are also an aphrodisiac.  It’s said that Casanova (a famous 18th century lover) ate 50 oysters for breakfast every day.  Take a look at one of Cape Cod’s fabulous oyster farms:  Barnstable Seafarms owned by Les Hemmila.  And enjoy one of our favorite oyster recipes from “The New Irish Table“.

Baked Rock Oysters with Bacon, Cabbage and Guinness Sabayon
2 egg yolks
1/2 cup Guinness stout
Dash of fresh lemon juice
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, melted
4 outer green cabbage leaves, finely shredded                                                                       
1 teaspoon canola oil
4 slices Irish or Canadian bacon, chopped
24 oysters in the shell

In a double boiler, whisk egg yolks, Guinness, lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste.  Place over barely simmering water and whisk 3 to 5 minutes, or until sauce begins to thicken.  Remove from heat and gradually drizzle in melted butter until sauce is well blended.

Cook cabbage in salted boiling water 1 to 2 minutes, or until slightly wilted.  Drain and immerse in cold water.  Drain again.

In small skillet over medium heat, heat oil.  Cook bacon until crisp.  Using slotted spoon, transfer bacon to paper towels to drain.

Shuck oysters over small bowl.  Reserve deeper half of each shell and rinse under cold water.  Place shells on a bed of rock salt in a small baking sheet with sides.  Divide cabbage among the shells, put an oyster on top of each and sprinkle bacon over oysters.  Spoon some of the sabayon over each.  Place under pre-heated boiler 4 inches from heat and cook for about 3 minutes, or until sauce is browned and bubbling.  Makes 4 servings.

Bon Appetit!!!

Prince Edward Mussels in Pernod Infusion Broth

                                    Prince Edward Mussels in Pernod Infusion Broth

A recipe for Prince Edward Mussels in Pernod Infusion Broth from Chef/Owner Susan Connors of Pisces Restaurant and Bar in Chatham.

This recipe serves 1-2 people

Ingredients

15 mussels scrubbed and debearded
1/2 cup julienne leeks (washed thoroughly)
1/2 cup julienne fennel
1/2 teaspoon chopped garlic
pinch of crushed red pepper flakes
Star anise (break off one “star”)
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 Tablespoons of small diced fresh plum tomatoes
1 Tablespoon unsalted butter or more to taste
1 Tablespoon Pernod
Salt and Pepper to taste
1 teaspoon of snipped chives
1 lemon slice

Grilled or baked garlic bread (crostini)
olive and canola blended oil for cooking (1 1/2 Tablespoons)
2 10 inch saute pans

Directions

Heat oil over medium high heat
Add fennel and leeks, cook until just starting to get soft
Add garlic, red pepper flakes and anise, cook until garlic starts to soften (about 1 minute)
Add mussels and toss with ingredients in pan
Deglaze with white wine
Add lemon juice, butter and diced tomato – cover with second saute pan and steam until all mussels are open (about 4 – 5 minutes)
Add Pernod and salt and pepper to taste
Spoon mussels and broth into a bowl
Sprinkle with chives
Garnish with fresh lemon slice and grilled garlic crostini

Bon Appetit!!

http://www.capecodrestaurants.com/dining-guide/all/45_pisces_restaurant_and_bar/

The Kasbah Chronicles August 2014 / Kitty Morse

    Musings

Last month I mentioned that August 15, 1964 is a momentous date in my life. I have now lived FIFTY years in the United States! I celebrated with my mother, champagne, dear friends, and this decorative basket of succulents.

If you would like to read about my “immigration experience” and my arrival in the US, please follow the links to the August 2014 post on my website.

http://www.KittyMorse.com

My mother and I decided to celebrate our 50th by spending two days in Coronado where my husband was stationed in the Navy over 40 years ago. Have you visited lately?

To me, Coronado is still “utopia” with its mansions and villas fronted with emerald lawns, its 25-mile speed limit, its mile long sandy beach and sparkling bay front. When we lived there from 1973-1975, we picnicked in front of the world-famous Hotel Del (setting for the film, Some Like it Hot), and frequented a handful of unexciting restaurants, a shabby supermarket, and a sleepy main street. This time, we dined in bistros, overheard a multitude of languages, and dodged hordes of visitors on Orange Avenue. Yet, Coronado has retained much of its utopian charm. Don’t miss the stunning new library. http://www.coronado.ca.us/library

KITTY IN THE MEDIA:

I have probably mentioned at one time or another a cookbook that is close to my heart. The California Farm Cookbook (Pelican Publishing, 1999) took me to at least 200 farms in California to obtain the farmers’ recipes for THEIR product. I cook out of that book all the time! It is still in print and available on Amazon.com. Pelican recently sent out this e-mail blast.

http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=da9e6bb038ff756eb465c3f58&id=3b26c3f3a1

Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories is also available on Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/Mint-Tea-Minarets-Moroccan-Memories/dp/0985216441

Would you consider writing a short review of the book in the “write your own review” section? I am told this helps book sales! A few words will do.

How about that?!

Obama Welcomes African Leaders for Unusual Dinner

WASHINGTON — Aug 5, 2014, 10:49 PM ET

White House dinner

“The menu featured a largely American-style dinner with hints of Africa sprinkled throughout each of the four courses.

Guests dined on chilled spiced tomato soup and socca crisps, which are made of chick peas; chopped farm-stand vegetable salad using produce from the first lady’s garden; and grilled dry-aged Wagyu beef served with chermoula, a marinade used in North African cooking . . .”

COULD the White House chef have consulted Cooking at the Kasbah or my other books (I don’t think so!) In any case, here is the recipe. You can use chermoula with lamb, chicken, seafood, or vegetables:

                                                           CHERMOULA

Combine the ingredients and savor! Use spices to taste.

1/2 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
12 sprigs cilantro, minced
1 garlic clove, minced

CAPE COD: Heading to the East Coast?

Be sure to consult

http://www.capecodrestaurants.com/blog/

CASABLANCA:

There isn’t much to see from a historical standpoint in my hometown, so this may be an interesting venue for some.

A Casablanca, le seul musée du judaïsme du monde arabe (The ONLY Jewish museum in the Arab World, founded in 1997.)

“C’est l’unique musée juif dans le monde arabe”, souligne sa conservatrice Zhor Rhihil, fonctionnaire marocaine de confession musulmane.” 

http://dafina.net/gazette/article/casablanca-le-seul-mus%C3%A9e-du-juda%C3%AFsme-du-monde-arabe

Who knew?

Morocco surpasses the US in strawberry exports!

Les pays européens représentent 95% des exportations marocaines de fraises. L’Espagne a exporté 355.000 tonnes de fraises, suivis par le Mexique (266.000 tonnes), les États-Unis (164.000 tonnes) et la Chine (128.000 tonnes.)

Bismillah and Bon Appétit!

and

Happy Labor Day

Artichoke Pesto

                                                   Artichoke Pesto

A delicious Cape Cod recipe for all seasons from Innkeepers Joe and Annemarie Charbonneau of Handkerchief Shoals Inn, Harwich.

Artichoke Pesto

Serves 8 – 10

1 package 8oz, of frozen artichokes hearts thawed
1 large bunch of fresh basil
2/3 cup fresh grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
zest and juice of one lemon
2 cloves garlic
1/2 teas salt

Combine thawed artichokes, basil, garlic, lemon zest and juice and salt in food processor. Run the machine to finely chop all ingredients, stopping the machine to scrap down sides. Then with machine running drizzle in olive oil. Place mixture in a bowl and hand mix in Parmesan cheese.
Spread pesto over toasted baguette slices.

Bon Appetit!!

http://www.capecodlodgings.com/accommodations/all/22_handkerchief_shoals_inn/

Salubrious Salutations

“Salubrious Salutations” will bring to the attention of fellow wine drinkers the importance of the initial Toasts when you open a bottle of wine.   Randomly over the next year we will enlighten you with some clever, some meaningful, some brilliant and some humorous Toasts.  Here is our first.

Some Words of Wisdom from friend and fellow world traveler Gail Kaley Kumpf of Marietta, Georgia:

“It’s not the wine you drink; it’s the friends you lift the glass with!”

Barnstable Association of Recreational Shellfishing (BARS) / August 2014

Elsa Sampou has lived on Cape Cod in West Barnstable for close to 30 years.  She and her husband Andre bought an old 1780 house that cried out for love and attention with a hope that this would be a great gathering place for their large family.  They have not been disappointed as over the years there’s been many celebrations and parties.  Before coming to the Cape, Elsa was not a fan of shellfish at all, but of course, once here, and husband Andre being a hunter/gatherer, they were soon checking out the gifts from the sea.  Clamming was top priority but then one day they kayaked out of Barnstable Harbor to a place called Mussel Point; this was a long time ago when the colony of mussels was abundant.  They came home with an enormous “catch”.  The job of cleaning them was left to Andre and the cooking left to Elsa.  The best recipe she found was for Mussels Mariniere.  There are many ways to prepare mussels, mostly steaming them in wine and seasoning them either spicy or creamy.  They are also a great addition to other seafood dishes, sitting among shrimp, lobster, scallops or clams – a gourmet feast!

Over the last few months we have posted a sampling of recipes from “The B.A.R.S. Book of Favorite Shellfish Recipes”.  These recipes are from members of the B.A.R.S. Board of Directors, their families, friends, and associates.  The cookbook includes Appetizers, Soups, Main Courses, Desserts and This & That.  There are helpful cooking hints throughout this very unique Cape Cod cookbook.

“The B.A.R.S. Book of Favorite Shellfish Recipes” is available for $17.00 by clicking this link to the B.A.R.S. website  http://shellfishing.org.   All proceeds from this cookbook go to  scholarships and the promotion of the BARS Mission Statement.

For further information on BARS and its Mission Statement go to http://shellfishing.org/.

Now enjoy Elsa Sampou’s recipe for Mussels Mariniere!!!

                                                   Mussels Mariniere

2 Tbls. flour
5 Tbls. unsalted butter, softened
2 cloves garlic, chopped
4 Tbls. onion, chopped
2 bay leaves
1 1/2 cups white wine
2-4 dozen mussels
1/4 cup heavy cream
4 Tbls. dijon mustard
2 egg yolks, lightly beaten

In a small bowl, blend flour and 3 tablespoons butter together with a fork until smooth.  Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat in a heavy bottom saute pan with a lid that fits tightly.  Add garlic, onion and bay leaf and cook, stirring for a few minutes.  Add white wine and bring to a boil.  Add mussels, cover and cook until shells open.

Discard any unopened shells.  Remove mussels from liquid with a slotted spoon and place in a bowl.  Bring liquid to a boil and remove from heat.  Quickly add flour and butter mixture and put back on the heat, whisking constantly.  Bring mixture to a boil until it thickens.  Cook for another minute or two to cook out the taste of raw flour.  Reduce heat to low.  Add cream, mustard and egg yolks.  Heat to warm, stirring constantly.  Don’t bring back to a boil or the eggs might curdle.  Pour sauce over mussels and sprinkle with chopped parsley.  Add generous slices of crusty french bread for dipping into the sauce.  Yum!  C’est merveilleux!